British Wildlife Helpline
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First Aid for Mammals

Bats

Inert, cold
Weigh the bat if you have a suitably sensitive scale and make a note of it.
Adult Pippistrelles only weigh 4-6 grams and babies 1-2 grams so the usual kitchen scales won't be any good.
Rehydration is the priority
The bat needs to be warmed up gradually before it will be able to drink or eat. 
A  small bat can be held in a warm hand but the best way is to find a small box with a well fitting lid.
Line it with a few layers of soft facial tissues or kitchen roll and put the bat inside.
Half fill a hot water bottle, wrap it in a small towel and put the box on top of it so the heat will gradually warm the bat.
Provide humidity in the box by soaking a facial tissue in drinking water, crumpling it up and putting it in a small plastic lid or or a tiny saucer made from baking foil.
this will add moisture to the air and provide a safe source of water if the bat recovers.
Never put an open container of water, even a tiny one, with  a sick bat. It may fall in and drown.

Rehydration

If possible, crush tablets of homoeopathic Aconite and Arnica together and dissolve in a few drops of water.
Make a small quantity of Lectade or other Rehydration Fluid and add the dissolved tablets solution.
Warm over a small pot of hot water and dab on the bat's lips with a very small artists' paintbrush or cotton wool bud.

Cat Victim

Check the body temperature and provide a warm, secure, ventilated box on a heat source to let the bat warm up and recover.
If possible, crush tablets of homoeopathic Aconite and Ledum together and dissolve in a few drops of water.
Make a small quantity of Lectade or other Rehydration Fluid and add the dissolved tablets.
Warm over a small pot of hot water, test temperature on your wrist and dab on the  lips with a fine artists' paintbrush or cotton wool bud.

See also:   Bats        Common problems         Bat contacts